Course Descriptions 2016-2017

Each of the seminars listed below lasts two hours per week. Classes meet from mid-August until early May.

 

Beginning Latin I—An introduction to Latin for elementary and early middle-school students. The students are introduced to declensions and conjugations, a good amount of vocabulary, and learn some Roman history and culture. The textbook, Latina Christiana, was designed to lead the student into Henle Latin I. Two hours weekly study outside of class.

 

Beginning Latin II—We continue our exploration of Latin with deeper study of the language and with additional vocabulary.  This course is aimed at those who took Beginning Latin I who are too young to begin high school Latin I. All students will take the Introductory National Latin Examination in March. The text is Latina Christiana II.

 

Latin I—A first-year high school course. Covered in this course are Latin vocabulary, grammar, and syntax as well as some Roman history and culture. Grammar includes the five declensions, active indicative verb conjugations,  and the use of adjectives and pronouns. All students take the National Latin Exam in March. All students must pass a final exam in May to enter Latin II. Work outside of class: 3-4 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List. Suggested student age: 7th grade and up.

 

Latin II—A second-year high school course. Students continue to develop their grammar skills by learning subjunctive verbs, comparative adjectives and adverbs, indirect statements, ablative absolutes, etc. Students read some Latin poetry and selections from the Vulgate Bible. All students take the National Latin Exam in March. All students must pass a final exam in May to enter Latin III. Work outside of class: 3-4 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Latin III—A third-year high school course. Students read from various authors: Caesar, Cicero, Catullus, Pliny, etc. All students take the National Latin Exam in March. Work outside of class: 3-4 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Advanced Placement Latin—This class meets the standards of the Advanced Placement Latin test for Virgil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Gallic Wars. We will engage in an in-depth study of both authors. All students take the National Latin Exam in March. Students are strongly encouraged to take the Advanced Placement exam in May. Work outside of class: 4-6 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric I (3Rs I)—Aimed at students in upper elementary and early middle school, this class offers a literature-based approach to writing. Mastering the essay is a primary goal of the class. Typically the student reads and discusses a work of literature—Treasure Island, for example, or Animal Farm—and then writes a paper about the book. Students keep a journal for the year as well as engage in other writing projects. Work outside of class: 3-4 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List

 

Reading, Writing, and Rhetoric II (3Rs II)—Like 3Rs I, this class offers a literature-based approach to writing. Mastering the essay is again a goal of the class. Students do not have to take 3Rs I to enroll in this class. Work outside of class: 3-4 hours. Texts: See Reading List.

 

World At War—This military history class counts as credits for both history and literature. Though our focus is on the military history of Europe and the United States, we will also look at warfare in Asia and Africa. Students will read various books of military history, but will also receive exposure to politics, religion, and philosophy. This course includes a good deal of reading each week, various essays and papers, and class discussions. Work outside of class: 5-7 hours weekly. Students unwilling to put that amount of time into the course will perform poorly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

World History:  Art, Literature, and Philosophy—This course counts as credits for both history and literature. We will focus on art and ideas and their roles in history. The course will center on European history,  but we will visit other parts of the world as well. This course includes a good deal of reading each week, various essays and papers, and class discussions. Work outside of class: 5-7 hours weekly. Students unwilling to put that amount of time into the course will perform poorly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Advanced Placement English Literature—This class seeks to meet the standards of the Advanced Placement English Literature examination. Members of this class will examine selected works of literature in depth and will master the analytical tools standard in such a course. Students taking this course are encouraged to take the Advanced Placement test in May. Work outside of class: 4-6 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Advanced Placement English Language and Composition—The object of this course is to give older students who are already familiar with the essay the opportunity to further develop their writing, analytical, and rhetorical skills. Students will study the works of a various writers, ranging from Annie Dillard to Walker Percy. Students will also learn how to analyze the rhetorical devices used by different writers and how to employ those devices in their own writing. Work outside of class: 4-6 hours weekly. Texts: See Reading List.

 

Advanced Placement World History—The object of this course is to provide the student with a survey of world history and to prepare for the AP examination in May. We will use the textbook found on the reading list, but we will also do a great deal of work using online resources. Recommended for grades 10-12. This course requires 6-7 hours of study outside the classroom. Texts: See Reading List.